Discussion:
Conscription and name changes
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Trudy Barch
2017-12-22 20:37:42 UTC
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Happy Chanukah and Happy New Year to all.

An European name prior to 1900 that was changed because of conscription
'problems'- how can I find the original name? and prove it is the same
family/person?

Thank you, Trudy Barch
Former Illinois current Florida
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Herbert I Lazerow
2017-12-24 03:43:52 UTC
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Trudy Barch wrote:
<An European name prior to 1900 that was changed because of conscription
'problems'- how can I find the original name? and prove it is the same
family/person?>

Not easily. First, try to get his or her Jewish name. The best source of this
would be the person's tombstone or ketubah. Lacking either of those
sources, you might be able to find the given names of the person's
father and mother on that person's death certificate or application
for a social security card. If both names are common names, like
Avraham ben Yaakov, it will be more difficult than if both names are less common.

Second, look for an approximate date of birth or date of marriage.

Third, try to get the same information for the individual's siblings.Then go to the
records for the town from which you think he came and try to match a person with
that name who was born or married around the right time. But be aware that our
ancestors often had two given names, like Avraham Volf or Tzvi Girsh, and official
records for the same individual may show only the first, only the second, or both
given names.
Bert
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Herbert Lazerow
***@sandiego.edu
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